DESCRIPTION OF ENV MODULES

Workload Components: A-B-C-D-E
A: lecture hours per week
B: tutorial hours per week
C: lab hours per week
D: hours for projects, assignments, fieldwork, etc. per week
E: hours for preparatory work by a student per week

ENV1101 Environmental Studies: An Interdisciplinary Overview

  • Modular credits
  • 4
  • Prerequisites
  • NIL
  • Workload
  • 2-4-0-4-0
  • Preclusions
  • NIL
  • Cross-listings
  • GEM1903

In this module, students are introduced to the scope of environmental studies and the critical foundation for the higher-level, ENV modules. Students come away armed with some basic knowledge and skills that are key to this field. This module also instils in them the ethos of environmental stewardship, especially the notion that we must all take individual and collective action toward sustainability. In this way, this module is a good initiation to the BES programme. Students begin to understand the main environmental problems, and to appreciate their inherent complexity (involving many causes and stakeholders) and therefore why they can only be solved by taking an interdisciplinary approach. By imparting good academic practices and allowing students to practice different forms of assessment, ENV1101 prepares students for the rest of their programme. By participating in individual and collective activities that revolve around the theme of sustainability, students also come away with a spirit of belonging to a group of individuals all dedicated to a common purpose – caring for the planet.

See also course website

ENV1202 Communications for Environmental Studies

  • Modular credits
  • 4
  • Prerequisites
  • ES1000 and/or ES1102 (if required)
  • Workload
  • 2-2-0-4-2
  • Preclusions
  • NIL
  • Cross-listings
  • NIL

This module is designed for undergraduate students pursuing the degree in the Bachelor of Environmental Studies with the aim of helping them to develop critical thinking, reading, writing and speaking skills that are relevant for communication with the academia and public. The curriculum is organised along three main interrelated areas: i) Communication with the public: Raising public awareness of environmental issues through science-based advocacy, ii) Communication with the academia: Developing skills in academic writing, iii) Argumentation within environmental studies: Examining environmental issues using the Precautionary Principle.

ENV2101 Global Environmental Change

  • Modular credits
  • 4
  • Prerequisites
  • ENV1101
  • Workload
  • 2-0-0-6-2
  • Preclusions
  • LSM3272
  • Cross-listings
  • NIL

As a continuation of ENV1101, this module examines the role of human activities such as technological changes, increasing urbanization, market forces and economics, as well as ongoing geopolitical forces in environmental and climate change. Using current global environmental and climate change challenges, this module discusses various ways communities and societies have utilized indigenous knowledge (folk science), scientific evaluations, technological innovations, societal regulations and laws, environmental monitoring (benchmarking, quality controls), and policy prescriptions (based on scientific and societal evaluations) in environmental management at various scales. The module hopes to engage students in thinking about adaptive and mitigation options, both locally and globally in relation to reduced environmental sustainability.

ENV2102 Environmental Law, Policy, Governance & Management

  • Modular credits
  • 4
  • Prerequisites
  • ENV1101
  • Workload
  • 0-3-0-0-7
  • Preclusions
  • NIL
  • Cross-listings
  • NIL

This module will first introduce students to Environmental Law, particularly conservation and pollution laws, and how these are passed and implemented at the international, regional (ASEAN) and national (Singapore) levels.  It will emphasise that laws alone will not help in ensuring the quality of a country’s environment and the health of its citizens. Laws must be enforced, and the rule of law respected. Good governance is therefore a necessary component of sound environmental management. This module will next examine what constitutes good environmental governance. It will explore environmental and economic policies and how best to resolve the tensions between conservation and development.  It will study the setting up of effective administrative institutions, land use planning, the provision of environmental infrastructure (modern sanitation, water treatment plants, transport systems, etc).   It will then critically examine the workings of the main administrative agencies that are responsible for environmental management in Singapore.  It will also look into the work of local and international non-governmental organisations (NGOs) as well as multi-national corporations and corporate social responsibility in Singapore. Comparisons will be made with the administrative and legal systems in other jurisdictions.  This module will be taught by staff members from the Law Faculty as well as the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy.

ENV2103 Environmental and Public Health

  • Modular credits
  • 4
  • Prerequisites
  • ENV1101
  • Workload
  • 2-1-0-3-4
  • Preclusions
  • NIL
  • Cross-listings
  • NIL

Public Health is defined as “the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting health through the organized efforts and informed choices of society, organizations, public and private, communities and individuals.” Environmental health addresses all the physical, chemical, and biological factors external to a person, and all the related factors impacting behaviours. It encompasses the assessment and control of those environmental factors that can potentially affect health. It is targeted towards preventing disease and creating health-supportive environments.

This module provides an introduction to public health and environmental health, and the management of contemporary environmental health issues.

ENV3101 Environmental Challenges: Asian Case Studies I

  • Modular credits
  • 4
  • Prerequisites
  • ENV2101
  • Workload
  • 2-0-0-4-4
  • Preclusions
  • NIL
  • Cross-listings
  • NIL

Using selective Asian case studies through on-site field studies exposure, experimentation and documentation, this module addresses several key themes: a) understanding the nature of environmental problems (both physical and human induced environmental changes) in specific locations, sites and ecosystems; ii) the human impacts leading to specific environmental problems (pollution, water scarcity, deforestation, dwindling biodiversity); and iii) understanding indigenous adaptive mechanisms and other mitigation options in ensuring environmental sustainability. Students will participate in field studies of key sites, ecosystems and places where such challenges have taken place within the Asian region.

ENV3102 Environmental Challenges: Asian Case Studies II

  • Modular credits
  • 4
  • Prerequisites
  • ENV3101
  • Workload
  • 0-2-0-8-0
  • Preclusions
  • NIL
  • Cross-listings
  • NIL

The scope, scale and learning mission of ENV3102 are complex and challenging, due to the fieldwork and necessary preparation. ENV3102 allows students to put their  theoretical knowledge to the test in circumstances that also force them out of their comfort zone,  Led mainly by our BES Lecturers (but with considerable involvement by local partners), our students travel to another country in Asia (thus far, to the Philippines), where they spend just over two weeks collecting ecological and geographical data in an effort to evaluate (mostly community-based) solutions to some of the world’s most pressing environmental challenges. The module spans Special Term 1 of year 3, but the trip takes place in May only.

See also course website

ENV3103 Environmental Economics & Policy

  • Modular credits
  • 4
  • Prerequisites
  • EC1101E/EC1301
  • Workload
  • 1-3-0-3-3
  • Preclusions
  • NIL
  • Cross-listings
  • NIL

This module provides a comprehensive coverage of environmental economics and has been structured on the premise that course participants have little background in economics. The main objective of the module is to illustrate the following premises: the natural environment is the core of any economy and economic sustainability cannot be attained without environmental sustainability. The module consists of three parts, namely microeconomics of the environment, macroeconomics of the environment and environmental policy.

ENV3202 Environmental Studies Internship Programme (elective)

  • Modular credits
  • 4
  • Prerequisites
  • For students in year 2 or 3 only
  • Workload
  • 1-3-0-3-3
  • Preclusions
  • NIL
  • Cross-listings
  • NIL

ENV3202 is designed to help students gain working experience in the environmental industry during their degree programme
and prepare them for employment after graduation. We believe that giving students the chance to (1) assimilate and translate what they have learned from the curriculum into performing valuable tasks in the workplace and (2) acquire hard-to-teach soft skills, gives them an edge when they eventually transition to the work force. Students complete a structured, supervised internship with a host organisation (in Singapore or overseas) during both Special Terms of their 2nd or 3rd year (summer holiday).  They get the chance to see what really goes on within an organisation whose work relates somehow to solving environmental challenges, try on for size a potential career or future employer and see the applicability of what they are learning in the BES programme. Of course, they also come away with some real work experience for their resumés. Ultimately, the overall aim is to make them more employable, thereby contributing to the ability of the BES programme to graduate qualified environmental professionals who can work competently in the field.

See also course website

ENV4101 Environmental Management in Singapore

  • Modular credits
  • 4
  • Prerequisites
  • ENV3101 and ENV3102
  • Workload
  • 0-6-0-4-0
  • Preclusions
  • NIL
  • Cross-listings
  • NIL

This module, the final in a series of integrated modules for this degree, will focus on Singapore and evaluate how the city-state has managed its environmental challenges and human-nature relationships intra-nationally and extra-nationally (regionally and internationally). The module is a final summation, overview and synthesis of what was discussed in the earlier four modules and where appropriate will evaluate environmental ideas, concepts, policies and case studies in terms of its applications to the Singapore situation. To facilitate this, the module is predicated on a platform of seminars and/or round-table discussions with pertinent senior corporate chieftains, government officials, and non-government organization (NGO) leaders.